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Steve Barrett

I have been a photographer for about 20 years. Being based in the D.C. area, I spend a fair time on Capitol Hill. I have shot for Washingtonian Magazine, NPR, a bunch of newspapers and a myriad of college alumni magazines, as well as trade associations. My photos have appeared in Newsweek, Fortune, Time, and Vanity Fair and USA Today. Assignments have taken me from Bosnia to Buffalo, Mongolia to Milwaukee and even Iwo Jima! I'm pretty curious guy (or just nosy), and I just have a great time going places and meeting people I otherwise would have no link to. I find if you can spend five minutes with someone you can make all kinds of connections! Oh, and I play mandolin.

Website: http://www.stevebarrettphotography.com


comments from website visitors:

The fox has found the rabbit's lair.
Nerad Etamush
Parklawn, VA
Posted Wednesday, August 15, 2007 3:29PM

Hi Steve, Ran into Linda in downtown DC and she told me all about the project. And Max there, too. How cool is that? Would love to hear more when you return.
Norie Q.
Alexandria, VA
Posted Saturday, August 11, 2007 5:11AM

What an awesome adventure! Glad you included Max. Take me next time! Bring back some of that barracuda, will ya?
Rick B
New York City
Posted Wednesday, August 08, 2007 6:52AM

Steve, hope things are going well with you and Max as you embark on another teaching jouney. It's a scorcher today in states! Hope the natives understand your sense of humor and countless geopolitical references!
Mike O
Baltimore, MD
Posted Friday, August 03, 2007 5:38AM

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photos by this person (click to view larger):

Russell Baer
Steve Barrett

Small boy on errand
Steve Barrett

Nade
Steve Barrett

Max at REENCONTRO
Steve Barrett

Martial arts
Steve Barrett

Girl grinding corn
Steve Barrett

Girl carrying large log
Steve Barrett

photos of this person (click to view larger):

Human camera bag
Eugene Ahn

Mentoring
Lynn Warshafsky

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Two weeks in Mozambique

Steve Barrett
Photographer

Posted 2:30PM on Thursday, August 16, 2007 Pacific Time

We have been working with these kids in Mozambique for 2 weeks now! The kids' images speak for themselves. I have been impressed with how quickly some of the students have picked up on the nuances, in spite of the obvious language and technology issues. Though being on their own (some for most of their lives) these kids are well-mannered, enthusiastic and have a good capacity to learn. By and large, most of the subjects we run into are very friendly, and don't mind having their photos taken, especially by a kid with a camera.

Max (my son who turned 13 on this trip) has been a great asset to my small group, taking notes, keeping his eyes open, operating the cell phone, helping to make lunches, doing small errands, and running interference with curious neighborhood kids so the Reencontro kids can work. He also has the stealth asset of being a disarming way to connect to these kids that are about his age.

Most of the homes I have been to have no electricity and the water is brought from outside. They typically cook outside too. It is a way of life that is largely roughing it, with bits of contemporary life that I am still processing. It probably makes for some long nights in the winter.

It has been a pleasure working with the team assembled by Lynn and Jim of Venice Arts, with each member filling niches as needed. Kudos to all!

The photographers who are here to teach were invited to not take photos for the first week and concentrate on the kids. So this week I took a few pics of my own ...


Beginning at the beginning

Steve Barrett
Photographer

Posted 9:05PM on Friday, July 27, 2007 Pacific Time

I first met Jim Hubbard about 20 years ago. I was his student when he was teaching a course in Documentary photography. We hit it off pretty much right away (same birthday you know!) I guess we are like minded (read-wise ass)
Jim invited me to go to Romania with him to teach photography. I'll always be grateful to JH for that opportunity. We worked in an orphanage in Bucharest (casa di copi #10) in 1992. The dictator Ceausescu had recently been deposed and the orphanages were full. Jim and I traveled there for World Vision. We were teaching photography for empowerment and to show the world their life through their eyes. Most of the kids were both charming, troubled and " skin hungry" (craved attention and contact). They were eager to work with adults and responded well to a little attention.

It was a heady time, with Romania being in transition from a closed, bullet marked eastern block state to a developing one. Outside of Bucharest was a time machine where horse drawn carts were as common as automobiles. In one small village I visited near Pitesti, a very old woman said "I never thought I would see the day that an American would set a foot in my village".

These are things I'll never forget.

When JH called and asked if I wanted to do it all again in Mozambique I did not drop a beat! As a photographer this is the kind of thing I live for.

I have little preconceived Ideas of what to expect in Moz and my son and I are "empty vessels" for the hard work and experiences ahead.



 

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Before we could not build houses but today women can. We can do anything that men can do.
Pumla File
Cape Town project participant


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